If you didn't grow up exploring the great outdoors, taking a hike might intimidate you. Never fear, I share hacks to make your hike a success (even if you're taking your kids along). #optoutside #hikewithkids #survivalessentials #parenting #kids #summeractivities #hiking #outdoors #camping #waterpacks #funwithkids #nationalforest #parks #greenexercise

If you didn’t grow up exploring the great outdoors, taking a hike might intimidate you. Never fear, I share hacks to make your hike a success (even if you’re taking your kids along).

Make Your Hike a Success with These Simple Suggestions

Back in the day, we didn’t worry about drinking from streams, hiking unprepared, or wearing layers. My dad would hurry us all into our van and off we’d go for a day in the woods. I only remember carrying a canteen once, and on a bike ride, not a hike. Finding a dried-up tree frog in the bottom of the canteen soured me on using them. I preferred fresh water from streams.

We went on numerous backpacking trips, too. In retrospect, my parents deserve a medal for hauling four kids and all their stuff (plus a dog) outside for weekend-long adventures. We endured camping for three days in the rain, running out of food, and taking the wrong trail a time or two.

Since those halcyon days of childhood, I’ve learned a few tips and tricks that will help you make your hike a success. Most of all, I’ve learned from mistakes I’ve made as an adult and a mother. thanks to modern technologies, we don’t have to carry clunky canteens or suffer through sweat-logged clothing when out on a hike. I forgot to mention in the podcast the advisability of investing in some wicking clothing for hiking. Make sure everyone wears layers of wicking materials so they hike in comfort (and avoid hypothermia).

Whatever you do this summer (or fall, or winter, or spring), make sure you get outside for some green exercise! These tips will help make your hike a success.

Show Notes

Here are a few of my favorite water bladder systems. The wide mouth on the Hydropack (Nathan) and Platypus systems makes them easy to fill and clean.

Day hiking: You can add this giant bladder to your day pack or computer bag (the laptop section of most backpacks comes with built-in padding which will act as insulation).

Trail running: I have one of these packs for running. The pockets in front hold bear spray, cell phone, and other small essentials. The pockets in back have enough room for a light layer and plenty of snacks.

Remote camping: This system will filter water for a crowd if you’re camping near a water source for a few days.

If you know you’ll have a natural water source along your route, but you don’t want Giardia, check out this lightweight water filter system from Sawyer Products. I’ve used this multiple times on long hikes with students.

Camelback makes a wide variety of hydration packs, but most of them don’t have a waist strap, which helps prevent the pack from thumping against your back. Camelback packs work great for mountain biking, though.

Check out this post before you venture out on an extreme hike.

This post has 11 ways to signal for help when you’re lost.

If you didn't grow up exploring the great outdoors, taking a hike might intimidate you. Never fear, I share hacks to make your hike a success (even if you're taking your kids along). #optoutside #hikewithkids #survivalessentials #parenting #kids #summeractivities #hiking #outdoors #camping #waterpacks #funwithkids #nationalforest #parks #greenexercise

Come Back Next Week

Come back next week when I talk about two important hacks to help you on your journey to better health.

Don't miss these tips for making your hike a success (even if you have little ones). #optoutside #selfcarehacks Click To Tweet

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Anita Ojeda

Anita Ojeda juggles writing with teaching high school English and history. When she's not lurking in odd places looking for rare birds, you can find her camping with her kids, adventuring with her husband or mountain biking with her students.

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