privilege
Camping on the School Lawn?

“Mr. Ojeda gave me permission to camp on the school lawn over home leave,” one of my students declared earlier today.

“Ha!” I responded. “I don’t think so.”

The sentiment behind the fib catches my breath tonight as I ride down the road, our RV trailing behind us, to enjoy a few days of camping in a warmer climate.

My student wanted to stay on campus rather than go home for four days.

I grew up with incredible privilege.

No, I didn’t grow up in a rich family, but the stark difference between my upbringing and that of my students stabs me at times. I always had a house to live in—no matter what part of the country we lived in. My family has always loved me. Without a doubt, I have always felt wanted. My parents sacrificed so that I could attend Christian schools. I grew up with the certainty that I could be whatever I wanted to be.

I Grew Up With Incredible Privilege

After college, I got married, we had two daughters, and live a comfortable life. Yes, our family has gone through some rough times. But I know without a doubt that we’re working exactly where God wants us. Some days the fierce love for my students wars with my need to take care of myself.Privilege

I need time alone with Pedro. But I also feel guilty that I can’t take all of the kids who don’t want to (or shouldn’t) go home along with us. I feel the guilt of privilege each time I hear of someone oppressed or denied because of the color of their skin, their gender, sexual preference, religion, political party, socioeconomic status, or lack of education.

My prayer? That I never forget that this ‘privilege’ really means ‘responsibility.’ God’s accounting system works like this: He gives you things—opportunities, blessings, family, love—and you give back.

You take responsibility for sharing what you’ve been given with those in need. You don’t judge, you just give.

At the same time, you learn to take care of yourself without indulging yourself. You build relationships (you DON’T swoop in with all the answers). It gets messy sometimes, this living responsibly. People break your heart, but you learn to take that broken heart to Jesus. You have that privilege. Always.

Privilege means sharing what you’ve been given without judgement. Click To Tweet

18 Comments

  1. I agree! This was my angle, too. Privilege and responsibility may seem like opposites, but they’re not. Privilege is a gift; it’s our responsibility to use it well.

  2. Amen! So much THIS: “. I feel the guilt of privilege each time I hear of someone oppressed or denied because of the color of their skin, their gender, sexual preference, religion, political party, socioeconomic status, or lack of education.” I’m right there with you. I’m in the 38 spot this week.

  3. Anita, I LOVE where you took this post. And this right here:

    this ‘privilege’ really means ‘responsibility.’

    You said it so well. God gives to us so we can, in turn, give to others. LOVED this post, my friend!

  4. Hi
    I love your statement: My prayer? That I never forget that this ‘privilege’ really means ‘responsibility.’ God’s accounting system works like this: He gives you things—opportunities, blessings, family, love—and you give back.

    Beautiful,
    Blessings
    Janis
    #46 FMF

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Anita Ojeda

Anita Ojeda juggles writing with teaching high school English and history. When she's not lurking in odd places looking for rare birds, you can find her camping with her kids, adventuring with her husband or mountain biking with her students.

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